News from the HMI

HMI Presentation on “The American Diabetes Association’s 79th Scientific Sessions”

NEW YORK, May 01, 2019 – Human Microbiology Institute, today announced a poster presentation “A New Developmental Model of Type 1 Diabetes—An Association between Autoimmunity, the Dynamics of Gut Amyloid-Producing E. Coli, and Their Phages” at the The American Diabetes Association’s 79th Scientific Sessions  being held on June 7-11, San Francisco. The presentation includes the first microbiome-based discovery for the role of microbiome in triggering Type 1 Diabetes autoimmunity.

 

Research Presented in an Oral Session at 5th Annual Translational Microbiome Conference 2019: Type 1 Diabetes: Primary Prevention Therapeutic Programs and First Pre-Autoantibody Biomarker Based on Association Between Autoimmunity and Dynamics of Amyloid-Producing E.coli

Bacteriophages are Potential New Human Pathogens

Human Microbiology Institute Research the First to Demonstrate that Amyloid-producing Bacteria and Bacteriophages Can Trigger Type 1 Diabetes

Research was presented at the 5th Annual Translational Microbiome Conference 2019

 

Boston, MA, April 17, 2019 — Human Microbiology Institute (HMI), a not-for-profit scientific research organization, today presented data that demonstrate for the first time how microbiome can trigger type 1 diabetes. The study, conducted by Drs. V. and G. Tetz, was presented by Dr. G. Tetz in an oral session at 5th Annual Translational Microbiome Conference , April 16–18, 2019, in Boston.

5th Annual Translational Microbiome Conference 2019: Type 1 Diabetes: Primary Prevention Therapeutic Programs and First Pre-Autoantibody Biomarker Based on Association Between Autoimmunity and Dynamics of Amyloid-Producing E.coli

Type 1 Diabetes: Primary Prevention Therapeutic Programs and First Pre-Autoantibody Biomarker Based on Association Between Autoimmunity and Dynamics of Amyloid-Producing E.coli

Human Microbiology Institute research the first propose the concept of novel cause of Type 1 Diabetes development. In this study we discovered the effect of certain  gut bacteria and bacteriophages on triggering autoimmunity and  seroconversion in HLA-susceptible children.

 Research Will Be Presented at 5th Annual Translational Microbiome Conference (https://www.microbiomeconference.com/ )

Interview: Bacteriophages and the Microbiome

An interview with Dr. George Tetz, MD, Ph.D., discussing the discovery of the role of bacteriophages in nneurodegeneration is available online here

Discovering Prion-like Proteins in Eukaryotic Viruses

An interview with Dr. George Tetz, MD, Ph.D., discussing the discovery of prion-like domains in eukaryotic viruses, and the implications of this study on gene therapies and common neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease.The full text interview is available online here

Neuroscience 2018: HMI’s Abstract Has Been Selected as a Hot Topic

Our presentation “Parkinson’s disease and bacteriophages as its overlooked contributors” has been selected as a Neuroscience 2018 Hot Topic, which SfN distributes to the media. Limited copies of the Hot Topics book are printed exclusively for the media.

Parkinson’s Disease Pathogenesis may have a Bacterial Virus Component According to Research Conducted by Human Microbiology Institute

NEW YORK, July 17, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Human Microbiology Institute (HMI), a not-for-profit scientific research organization, and Tetz Laboratories today announced the publication of a study in Scientific Reports that for the first time may implicate bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The article, entitled “Parkinson’s disease and bacteriophages as its overlooked contributors” is available online here: www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-29173-4.

HMI Discovers Previously Unknown Prion-Like Viral Proteins, Opening New Targets for Antiviral Drugs

HMI Discovers Previously Unknown Prion-Like Viral Proteins, Opening New Targets for Antiviral Drugs

NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / July 10, 2018 / Researchers at the Human Microbiology Institute(HMI) and Tetz Laboratories have discovered thousands of prion-like domains in human viruses, prompting research that opens new ways of viral pathogenicity, suggests new targets for development of new antiviral drugs and links viruses to diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Bacteriophages: Are they an overlooked driver of Parkinson’s disease?

Bacteriophages: Are they an overlooked driver of Parkinson’s disease?

June 10, 2018 – Atlanta, GA – In the first study of its kind, researchers from the New York-based Human Microbiology Institute have discovered the role certain bacteriophages may play in the onset of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7th to June 11th in Atlanta, Georgia.

ASM Microbe 2018: Bacteriophages: Are They an Overlooked Driver of Parkinson’s Disease?

Bacteriophages: Are They an Overlooked Driver of Parkinson’s Disease?

Human Microbiology Institute research the first propose the concept of bacteriophages as human pathogens. In this study we discovered the effect of certain  bacteriophages on the microbiota of patients with Parkinson’s disease  (PD) that might contribute to the onset of this pathology

 Research Will Be Presented at American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Microbe 2018

 

 

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