News from the HMI

HMI’s Discovery of Bacterial DNA as a Seed that Triggers Propagation of Tau and Development of Alzheimer’s disease will be presented at UConn 2019 Microbiome Innovation Summit

HMI’s abstract was accepted for a poster presentation at the Microbiome Innovation Summit that will be held at The Jackson Laboratory on Friday November 1, 2019 and The Jackson Laboratory in Farmington, CT.

This year’s program will feature an outstanding diversity of speakers addressing a wide range of important topics in microbiome science across many disciplines. Speakers and panel discussions will address:

  • the current landscape in microbiome research and development
  • approaches for understanding the basis of host/microbe interactions
  • best practices for experimental design and reproducibility
  • engineering of microbial systems to meet specific objectives
  • future directions in microbiome commercialization
Human Microbiology Institute Announces Oral Presentation at the SfN19

Bacterial DNA promotes Tau aggregation  

Human Microbiology Institute Research the First to Demonstrate that Bacterial DNA Trigger Alzheimer”s Disease

Research was presented at the Society for Neuroscience 2019.  Society for Neuroscience was founded in 1969 by Ralph W. Gerard and, at nearly 37,000 members, has grown to be the largest neuroscience society in the world.

Chicago, IL October 19, 2019 — Human Microbiology Institute (HMI), a not-for-profit scientific research organization, today presented data that demonstrate for the first time how microbiome can trigger Alzheimer’s disease. The study, conducted by Drs. V. and G. Tetz, in collaboration with Claudio Soto was presented by Dr. G. Tetz in an oral session at Society for Neuroscience 2019 , October 19-23, Chicago, IL.

I’m presenting at #SfN19

 

I’m presenting at #SfN19

HMI is honored to participate at the 201st Annual Meeting of the New York Academy of Sciences

HMI as a Member The New York Academy of Sciences is honored to participate at the Academy’s 201st Annual Meeting.

During the event  special guests for a by-invitation-only screening of Jim Allison: Breakthrough (2019), the inspirational story of one scientist’s quest to find a cure for cancer. Today, Academy Member James P. Allison is well-known for receiving the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly with Japanese immunologist Tasuku Honjo for their discovery of cancer therapies that stimulate the immune system to attack tumor cells. This gripping documentary follows Dr. Allison’s life and work over several decades, and provides insight into what it means to struggle against skepticism and resistance in order to achieve the extraordinary. A Q&A session with Bill Haney, the film’s director, was  followed the screening.

HMI’s Discovery of Previously Overseen Target to Prevent Tau Misfolding was Selected as an Oral Presentation at the Society for Neurosciences 2019

Our presentation “ Bacterial DNA promotes Tau aggregation” has been selected as an oral report at the Society for Neurosciences 2019, October 19-23, Chicago, IL.

HMI Presentation on “The American Diabetes Association’s 79th Scientific Sessions”

NEW YORK, May 01, 2019 – Human Microbiology Institute, today announced a poster presentation “A New Developmental Model of Type 1 Diabetes—An Association between Autoimmunity, the Dynamics of Gut Amyloid-Producing E. Coli, and Their Phages” at the The American Diabetes Association’s 79th Scientific Sessions  being held on June 7-11, San Francisco. The presentation includes the first microbiome-based discovery for the role of microbiome in triggering Type 1 Diabetes autoimmunity.

 

Research Presented in an Oral Session at 5th Annual Translational Microbiome Conference 2019: Type 1 Diabetes: Primary Prevention Therapeutic Programs and First Pre-Autoantibody Biomarker Based on Association Between Autoimmunity and Dynamics of Amyloid-Producing E.coli

Bacteriophages are Potential New Human Pathogens

Human Microbiology Institute Research the First to Demonstrate that Amyloid-producing Bacteria and Bacteriophages Can Trigger Type 1 Diabetes

Research was presented at the 5th Annual Translational Microbiome Conference 2019

 

Boston, MA, April 17, 2019 — Human Microbiology Institute (HMI), a not-for-profit scientific research organization, today presented data that demonstrate for the first time how microbiome can trigger type 1 diabetes. The study, conducted by Drs. V. and G. Tetz, was presented by Dr. G. Tetz in an oral session at 5th Annual Translational Microbiome Conference , April 16–18, 2019, in Boston.

5th Annual Translational Microbiome Conference 2019: Type 1 Diabetes: Primary Prevention Therapeutic Programs and First Pre-Autoantibody Biomarker Based on Association Between Autoimmunity and Dynamics of Amyloid-Producing E.coli

Type 1 Diabetes: Primary Prevention Therapeutic Programs and First Pre-Autoantibody Biomarker Based on Association Between Autoimmunity and Dynamics of Amyloid-Producing E.coli

Human Microbiology Institute research the first propose the concept of novel cause of Type 1 Diabetes development. In this study we discovered the effect of certain  gut bacteria and bacteriophages on triggering autoimmunity and  seroconversion in HLA-susceptible children.

 Research Will Be Presented at 5th Annual Translational Microbiome Conference (https://www.microbiomeconference.com/ )

Interview: Bacteriophages and the Microbiome

An interview with Dr. George Tetz, MD, Ph.D., discussing the discovery of the role of bacteriophages in nneurodegeneration is available online here

Discovering Prion-like Proteins in Eukaryotic Viruses

An interview with Dr. George Tetz, MD, Ph.D., discussing the discovery of prion-like domains in eukaryotic viruses, and the implications of this study on gene therapies and common neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease.The full text interview is available online here

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